Injured Hiker Rescued at Castle RockProposition 1 requests tax hike to maintain

first_imgAn 18 year old woman is recovering from two broken ankles after falling at least 20 feet near Castle Rock Wednesday evening. Kent Sisson with Chelan County Search and Rescue says the rescue took some time. Audio Playerhttps://www.kpq.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/hiker-rescue-act-1-041818-.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Sisson says they had to lower her about 500 feet. Audio Playerhttps://www.kpq.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/hiker-rescue-act-2-041818-.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Sisson says she is in stable condition. The injuries are not life-threatening.last_img read more

Pacing the Brain

first_imgby, Dr. Al Power, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesThe news outlets were abuzz this week with a new line of research going on in Toronto and several US centers. This research uses deep brain stimulation (DBS) to help improve the cognitive function of people living with Alzheimer’s.Here’s how it works: electrodes are implanted in certain affected areas of the brain, which are accessed through holes made in the skull. The electrical impulses are hoped to reawaken nerve endings that are malfunctioning, thus staving off the decline that can be seen with the condition.The research is just beginning, with a few dozen people scheduled to be studied. The article lists some anecdotal reports of improved memory and other skills, including one man who appears to have had little or no decline over four years (though the article allows that no one knows what his rate of decline would have been without the DBS).Several people are hailing this new step in our approach to Alzheimer’s as a possible breakthrough in the making. So why do I not get filled with hope when I read about studies like this? At the risk of being seen as a “wet blanket” or having an overly simplistic understanding of the process, I will share some concerns I have.First of all, I want to better understand what we are trying to accomplish. Most available approaches to Alzheimer’s are focused on increasing the presence of certain chemicals in the brain synapses, to fight the loss of these chemicals. So we use drugs to squeeze out a bit more acetylcholine, or to keep it in the synapse a bit longer before it gets broken down. This does nothing to slow the nerve changes in the condition, but it may give people several more months at a certain level of function before they begin to lose the beneficial effect.It’s not a cure, not even effective in slowing the illness, but if it buys several more months of improved function, it can have an important effect on people’s lives—six more months before needing a nursing home, for example. But I have to ask how DBS works and what added benefit it might offer?It seems to me that “overdriving damaged nerve cells” is likely to be the major effect of the procedure. DBS may also awaken cells that are not being adequately used, but we all have those; might that not also happen in people without Alzheimer’s? We’ll never know, because there will never be a control group who gets these implants.If we are simply overdriving the damaged nerves, won’t the effect wear off, or exhaust those nerve reserves? And how long will that take? These are important questions, because this is an invasive surgical procedure, with associated risks and costs. Are we looking toward a future that will see this approach being used for the millions of people who will develop memory loss over the next few decades? Who will pay for these surgical procedures that may offer little more than the benefit that our current pills have given?These questions are important to me because there are non-invasive and non-medication techniques that also awaken brain connections and revive previously lost abilities. One perfect example is Dan Cohen’s iPod Project, which has shown the power of personalized music to cause impressive “awakenings” in people who had become withdrawn, non-communicative or distressed.There are many other examples I have seen with pets, art, therapeutic touch, storytelling, even good-old-fashioned attention to good communication and connection with people who have been disempowered and disengaged by our stigmatized approach to care. And while the anecdotal reports of DBS sound exciting, I can tell stories of these approaches that are far more numerous and just as striking.So…I don’t want to discount the exciting frontiers that people are exploring, but I have to ask: Why do we rush to fund studies that drill holes in people’s heads, but fail to fund studies that put iPod headphones over their ears?Related PostsTrust at StakeThe full text of Eilon Caspi’s recent journal article “Trust at stake: Is the “dual mission” of the U.S. Alzheimer’s Association out of balance?” is now available for free thanks to an anonymous donor seeking to raise awareness of the gross imbalance of effort and funding between the Association’s dual…What If Alzheimer’s Can’t Be Cured?Is it possible Alzheimer’s is the result of progressive vascular disease as a consequence of aging, and therefore curing Alzheimer’s will be as difficult as curing aging?A New Test for Diagnosing Alzheimer’s Before Symptoms Appear?Scientists may be one step closer to providing a simple, reliable, test for Alzheimer’s Disease years before symptoms – like memory loss – appear. Doctors have commonly used a variety of procedures in their attempts to diagnose AD, including beha…TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: Alzheimers Innovationlast_img read more

Tonsil removal as a child could mean chest infections risk as adults

first_imgFor this study the team of researchers from the University of Melbourne looked at 1.2 million children from Denmark, under the age of nine. The found that the risk of getting upper respiratory tract infections tripled when the tonsils and adenoids were removed. This study emphasized on the importance of long term risks of childhood surgeries. The children were followed up between 1979 and 1999. A total of 60,400 tonsillectomies or adenoidectomies or combined surgeries were performed during this period.The children who participated in the study were followed up until the age of 30 to determine their long term health risks. According to lead researcher Dr Sean Byars from the University of Melbourne, the tonsils and adenoids play an important role in the immune functions development of the child. There has been little research until now on the long term effects of removal of these organs in a person as a child. The tonsils and the adenoids prevent the entry of bacteria and viruses to the throat and lungs by fighting them off at the gates so to speak, explain researchers. They are usually removed when they are enlarged and they are obstructing the breathing. In children with enlarged tonsils and adenoids there is difficulty in breathing, recurrent chest and respiratory tract infections, tonsillitis, as well as recurrent middle ear infections.Related StoriesRevolutionary gene replacement surgery restores vision in patients with retinal degenerationNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenInitiating dialysis at higher level of kidney function linked to lower patient survivalThe team noted that while removal of the tonsils tripled the risk of getting upper respiratory tract infections such as rhinitis, bronchitis etc. as an adult, removal of the adenoids doubled the risk of the children to get chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) as adults. The risk of asthma and pneumonias were also raised by around 50 percent after these surgeries, they noted. The authors state that these results, “suggest the early life removal [of tonsils and adenoids] may slightly but significantly perturb processes important for later-life health.” Removal of these organs in childhood was also linked to skin and eye health problems especially linked to allergies, they added.Around 48,000 tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies are performed in Australia and numbers are similar in most other countries. The researchers state that the incidence of tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies that are unnecessary have gone down over the past decade. Nowadays the ones that are performed are usually indicated in the child. The authors suggest that alternatives to surgery should be considered in each case because of the life time risk that removal of these organs can produce. “Risks were significant for many diseases and large for some,” they write. Other experts in the filed have said that more studies on this are needed to come to a definitive conclusion. This is an important study they state, but definitive studies in future would be necessary before children are advised not to undergo tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies, when they needed one. By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJun 7 2018A large study has found that removal of the tonsils as a child can mean that the individual is more susceptible to chest infections as an adult. The study appeared in the latest issue of the journal JAMA Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. Source:https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/2683621center_img Open mouth showing tonsil. Image Credit: Elena11 / Shutterstocklast_img read more

Unwieldy health costs often stand between teachers and fatter paychecks

first_imgEmmarie Huetteman: ehuetteman@kff.org, @emmarieDC This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Jun 18 2018As teacher strikes flared this spring in more than half a dozen states, from West Virginia to Arizona, protesters bemoaned stagnant salaries, overcrowded classrooms and a lack of basic supplies like textbooks and computers.But often missing from hand-scrawled placards and fiery speeches was an issue that has contributed greatly to the financial woes of America’s schools: skyrocketing health care costs.Many teachers, like other public employees, have traditionally accepted a trade-off: In exchange for relatively low salaries, they could expect relatively generous benefits, including pensions and low- or no-cost health premiums.But in an era of $100,000-a-year drugs and government budget cuts, school districts are struggling to find the money to keep up their end of the bargain, forced to take away from classroom funding and even modest, cost-of-living raises. Many cash-strapped school boards, cities and legislatures view health care benefits as an unpredictable budget-buster.Meanwhile, teachers are being asked to fork over more of their paychecks to keep their health coverage, even as budget cuts have impelled them to use their own money for classroom supplies and to crowdsource money to buy computers.In Jersey City, N.J., where health care expenses have gone up an average of 10 percent annually as district funding has remained flat, teachers staged a one-day strike in March to protest rising costs.But with an underfunded school system and a $110 million health care bill that is expected to increase another 13 percent this year, teachers and officials accepted a mutually imperfect solution that included changes to their health care plan to end the strike and avoid cuts that would have gutted local schools.”We’re talking about 300 teachers being laid off to be able to afford our health care bill,” said Sudhan Thomas, president of the Jersey City Public Schools’ board of education.While the teacher strikes have ebbed with the school year, deals brokered to end walkouts mostly offered temporary fixes, with no long-term solution in sight.Proposed cuts to health benefits in West Virginia were also behind the first strike this year, shuttering the state’s public schools for nine days and inspiring similar protests in several states. When officials initially extended teachers a 1 percent pay raise, small in comparison to an imminent hike in their health insurance contributions, teachers rejected the offer.”You really know you have arrived when you become a verb,” said David Haney, executive director of the West Virginia Education Association, whose wife is a teacher. “Don’t make me go West Virginia on you.”A Pay Equation That Doesn’t Add UpTeacher pay was below the national average of $59,660 in the six states that saw significant demonstrations this year — West Virginia, Oklahoma, Arizona, Kentucky, Colorado and North Carolina. But teachers are losing ground nationally.The average teacher salary in the United States has decreased by 4 percent since 2009, adjusted for inflation, according to a report released in April by the National Education Association, an advocacy group for public school teachers. During that time, public schools have seen their revenue shrink, with federal funding dropping 19.5 percent, particularly after Congress’ across-the-board spending cuts known as budget sequestration took effect in 2013.As funding has declined, the cost of health insurance has gone up. State and local governments paid 14.5 percent more last year to cover a primary, secondary or special education teacher and her or his family than they did in 2008, adjusted for inflation.According to that data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in March 2017, family coverage for one teacher cost state and local governments an average of $1,010.85 per month.Put another way, a 2015 report from the George W. Bush Institute’s Education Reform Initiative estimated that it cost about $550 per pupil to cover American teachers’ insurance expenses.Educators have also felt the sting of growing health insurance costs, especially as officials have shifted some of the burden to them. Primary, secondary and special education teachers paid 25.4 percent more last year to insure themselves and their families than they did in 2008, according to BLS data adjusted for inflation.Related StoriesStudy estimates health care costs of uncontrolled asthma in the U.S. over next 20 yearsRevolutionary cancer drugs that target any tumor to be fast-tracked into hospitals by NHSEmploying new federal rule on health insurance plans could save moneyTeachers paid an average of $585.71 per month — more than $7,000 annually — in premiums for family health insurance coverage in March 2017.For early-career teachers, that price is especially unmanageable. In Pueblo, Colo. — where teachers secured raises and an additional $50 a month toward health insurance premiums after walking out in May — a new teacher makes $35,277, according to Suzanne Ethredge, president of the Pueblo Education Association.And even where school systems offer teachers generous plans, with low deductibles and minimal premium contributions, the educators frequently have to pick up the costs for family members.Many States, Common ThemesThe standoff in West Virginia typified the strains in states grappling with rising benefit costs on budgets strained by tax cuts and the recession.Teachers, like other West Virginia public employees, pay for insurance based on what they earn. For a plan that allows some choice of doctors and hospitals, that means $59 per month for someone making less than $20,000, but $164 per month for someone making more than $125,000.Last fall, the Public Employees Insurance Agency floated the ideas of slashing the number of salary tiers used to calculate contributions, adding spouses’ salaries in those calculations and charging per person for family coverage rather than a flat fee.The agency further announced that state employees would soon be required to use a wellness app called Go365, incurring penalties for failing to meet their health goals or for declining to use the system altogether.So when state lawmakers proposed a mere 1 percent raise to an average salary of just $45,555, teachers pushed back. They refused to return to work until officials agreed to a 5 percent raise, scuttled the Go365 plan and delayed the health care hikes so a task force could review them.In Oklahoma, the strikers publicly focused their complaints on operational costs like textbooks and salaries. They secured roughly an extra half a billion dollars, said Alicia Priest, president of the Oklahoma Education Association. “We got everything that we could out of legislators this year,” she said.But Priest said health care costs remain a serious issue for school personnel. While the state covers teachers’ individual premiums, covering a spouse and children can cost an additional $1,200 per month, she said — a significant portion of a teacher’s starting salary.She said that some teacher aides work only for the health insurance for their families — in some cases writing a check to the district to cover the difference between meager salaries and their premiums.While the advent of summer break has calmed the protests, future strikes look likely, said Paul Reville, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and former Massachusetts secretary of education. The fact that most teachers negotiated at least some concessions proved the tactic effective enough, especially as health care costs continue to rise.”The shoe is pinching,” he said, “and people are reacting.”last_img read more

Kobe Proton Center starts clinical application of RayStation 7

first_imgJohan Löf, CEO of RaySearch, says: The new state-of-the-art center opened in 2017 and was one of the first clinical installations for particle therapy for RayStation in Japan. The RayStation system has been adapted to Mitsubishi Electric Corporation’s special PBS delivery techniques. The order was placed in 2016, and the adaptation was successfully validated last year in partnership with Mitsubishi Electric Corporation.Related StoriesAVO and RaySearch enter into collaboration agreement to support the LIGHT systemUIH and RaySearch enter into new partnershipRaySearch introduces a new version of groundbreaking oncology information systemKobe Proton Center is equipped with Mitsubishi Electric Corporation’s new multifunction irradiation nozzle, which can be used in uniform scanning or PBS mode and is capable of quickly switching between the two modes. The new technology includes a high dose rate beam delivery system that reduces irradiation time by 75 percent for improved patient comfort. Currently, the system is being used in uniform scanning mode, and PBS will be introduced in the near future.Tomohiro Yamashita, Medical Physicist at Kobe Proton Center, says: We are very pleased to see the first patient treatment with RayStation treatment plan at Kobe Proton Center. Proton therapy is a special focus area for RaySearch and Japan is one of the world’s most technologically advanced markets. We have a strong user base in Japan and are strengthening our presence to support the market more fully. I look forward to a successful cooperation with Kobe Proton Center.” Our important mission is to provide the best proton therapy possible to pediatric patients with cancer. To achieve the goal, we need the most advanced technology present and we are happy that RayStation 7 gives us opportunities to apply many advanced functionalities with efficiency. We hope RaySearch will continue to be a leading company in the area of proton therapy and enable us to provide the best care to pediatric patients.”center_img Jul 5 2018Kobe Proton Center in Japan has recently started clinical application of RayStation 7 for treatment. The first patient was treated in March 2018 using the uniform scanning method with a plan created in RayStation. Source:https://www.raysearchlabs.com/media/press/?year=2018&cisionid=2982419last_img read more

Oxygen therapy could help prevent dementia in people with breathing difficulties

first_img Source:http://www.physoc.org/ I am typically used to working with young, healthy individuals, and so this study in patients with lung disease was an eye-opening experience. I learned more about where I want to take my research career in the future, and how I want to design my research to hopefully improve treatments for people with breathing difficulties.” Jul 6 2018Breathing in additional oxygen improves the function of blood vessels in the brain of people with breathing difficulties caused by lung conditions, according to new research published in Experimental Physiology. These findings could have implications for future research aiming to prevent the development of diseases affecting the brain, such as dementia.Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the collective term for a group of lung conditions that cause long term breathing difficulties. It is a common condition affecting mainly middle-aged or older adults who smoke, with symptoms including breathlessness and a chesty ‘smokers’ cough. Individuals with COPD are at higher risk of dementia – one current theory suggests that this is due to lower brain oxygen levels as a result of problems with blood supply from blood vessels in the brain. In line with this theory, some studies have reported that giving COPD patients additional oxygen reduced their risk of developing dementia. However, until now, the mechanisms underlying this positive effect had not been fully investigated.The research aimed to establish the effect of supplying additional oxygen on both blood flow to the brain and blood vessel function in COPD patients. The researchers used ultrasound to view and measure blood flow in the brain in these patients at rest, before and during delivery of this additional oxygen. The oxygen was delivered through the nasal passage for 20-30 minutes. In addition to testing blood flow in the brain, the authors also tested the link between brain activity and blood flow in the brain. Participants began this test with their eyes shut, having to open them and then read standardised text. This task was designed to increase activity in the brain, and as a result brain blood flow was expected to increase to provide adequate oxygen supply. Ultrasound was used to measure the extent to which brain blood flow increased. Pairing these ultrasound measures with a measurement of blood oxygen levels allowed authors to estimate how much oxygen delivery to the brain increased during the eyes open reading test.Related StoriesMetformin use linked to lower risk of dementia in African Americans with type 2 diabetesNew app created to help people reduce exposure to anticholinergic medicationsDementia patients hospitalized and involved in transitional care at higher ratesThe research team found that blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain was significantly increased during reading. This was due to blood vessels in the brain becoming dilated in response to the greater oxygen demand when the brain was active. It can thus be concluded that when COPD patients receive additional oxygen it improves the function of blood vessels in their brain.This study showed that providing extra oxygen improves the function of blood vessels in the brain by matching blood supply to the demands of the brain activity. However, COPD patients typically use this extra oxygen therapy throughout the day and for long periods of time, potentially years. This study does not indicate the influence of long term oxygen therapy on the function of blood vessels in the brain. Despite these potential limitations, this work has set the foundation for the researchers to investigate the biological systems that control oxygen delivery to the brain.Lead author Ryan Hoiland, an early career researcher, learned much from the research process:last_img read more

Targeting amino acid transporter may improve survival rates for nonsmall cell lung

first_imgJul 11 2018An amino acid transporter named xCT may affect the growth and progression of non-small cell lung cancer, a discovery that may predict the five-year survival rate of patients suffering from this cancer, now at 16 percent, researchers at Georgia State University and Vanderbilt University Medical Center have concluded.The team, led by Xiangming Ji of Georgia State and Pierre Massion of Vanderbilt University Medical Center, published their findings in the current issue of Oncogene.xCT is an amino acid transporter, which carries the amino acid cystine into the cells and exports glutamate, a chemical that nerve cells use to send signals to other cells. It provides the key building blocks for glutathione (GSH) synthesis, which feeds cancer cell function and growth. The researchers used sulfasalazine, an anti-inflammatory drug often used to treat Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis and related diseases, to reduce tumor formation by inhibiting the function of xCT.Related StoriesStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerPrevious studies published in cancer research journals show sulfasalazine’s ability to affect xCT in other forms of cancer, including breast, bladder and small cell lung cancer.Researchers first examined xCT protein expression in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and found larger quantities in the non-small cell lung cancer cells compared to normal lung tissue.By analyzing protein expression of patients from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, the researchers found patients with higher xCT expression have a lower five-year cancer survival rate. On the positive side, the data show xCT as a therapeutic targeting candidate.Ji and Massion tested the cancer cells in the laboratory and in mice, discovering that targeting xCT genetically or therapeutically could reduce the tumor formation in vitro (in cell culture) and in vivo (in living organisms). They also found only cells with elevated xCT expression were more sensitive to glutamine withdrawal. The results show strong evidence that lowering xCT may improve survival rates for individuals with non-small cell lung cancer.”In conclusion, our results demonstrate that xCT is a major regulator of metabolic reprogramming with overarching effects on glucose metabolism, glutamine dependency and intracellular GSH/GSSG redox balance. All these metabolic effects contribute to lung cancer development,” Ji said.The expression of xCT is correlated with a poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer and represents a new opportunity to therapeutically target this biomarker in molecularly stratified non-small cell lung cancer patients. Further studies are needed to better understand the unwanted communication between xCT and other tumor-associated cell signaling pathways such as MYC, KRAS and NOTCH in the formation of lung cancer tumors. Source:https://news.gsu.edu/2018/07/10/common-drugs-impact-on-amino-acid-transporter-may-offer-non-small-cell-lung-cancer-patients-new-hope/last_img read more

Top stories Vampire squirrels Bigfoot DNA and disappearing plastic

Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country There should be millions of tons of plastic floating in the world’s oceans, given our ubiquitous use of the stuff. But a new study finds that 99% of this plastic is missing. One disturbing possibility: Fish are eating it.Nature retracts controversial stem cell papersEarlier this year, two papers published in the journal Nature reported that simply stressing adult cells could turn them into powerful stem cells called STAP (stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency) cells—and immediately drew accusations of plagiarism and image manipulation. Now, Nature has published a much-anticipated retraction of both papers.’Vampire’ squirrel has world’s fluffiest tailThe rarely seen tufted ground squirrel is a weird little animal. It’s twice the size of most tree squirrels, and it reputedly has a taste for blood. Now, motion-controlled cameras have revealed another curious fact: It has the bushiest tail of any mammal compared with its body size.Nearly one-third of Americans aren’t ready for the next generation of technologyAlthough most Americans have access to the Internet, a large percentage of them may be suffering from a lack of digital readiness. A new survey finds that nearly 30% of Americans either aren’t digitally literate or don’t trust the Internet.’Bigfoot’ samples analyzed in labScientists have performed the first peer-reviewed genetic survey of biological samples supposedly collected from yetis, Bigfoots, and Sasquatches around the world. The results? At least in the lab, these elusive, hairy, humanoid creatures are nothing more than bears, horses, and dogs. 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) People would rather be electrically shocked than left alone with their thoughtsIt seems many of us don’t like being left alone with our thoughts. According to a new study, 67% of men and 25% of women would rather give themselves an electric shock than just sit quietly in a room and think.Ninety-nine percent of the ocean’s plastic is missing Email read more

DOE watchdog to look into why Los Alamos scientist was fired

first_imgThe letter, from the director of DOE’s Office of Hearings and Appeals, explains the rationale: “The Department’s senior leadership takes the issue you raise seriously, and will not tolerate retaliation or dismissals of employees or contractors for the views expressed in scholarly publications.” Zaid calls DOE’s decision “a smart move on their part.”Gregory Friedman, DOE’s longtime inspector general, has been outspoken over the years in criticizing what he sees as lax security, wasteful spending, or inappropriate conduct by DOE lab officials. So outsiders are eager to see what conclusions Friedman might draw from the Doyle case.Correction: 9/16/2014, 12:05pm: The caption on the photo has been corrected; the sign marks the entrance to the municipality of Los Alamos, not the laboratory. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country An independent watchdog at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will investigate whether political scientist James Doyle was booted out of Los Alamos National Laboratory this summer after writing about the futility of nuclear weapons as a deterrent.In a letter today to Doyle’s attorney, Mark Zaid, DOE officials rejected Doyle’s petition to reverse or modify his dismissal this summer. Doyle had argued that the lab’s decision to classify the scholarly article—“Why Eliminate Nuclear Weapons?”—after it had appeared in the February-March 2013 issue of Survival: Global Politics and Strategy violated federal guidelines and that he was wrongly punished. Los Alamos officials have said that Doyle was laid off for budgetary reasons.It’s no surprise that DOE stands by that decision. But what has raised eyebrows is that the head of the National Nuclear Security Administration, retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Frank Klotz, has asked the department’s inspector general to determine “whether Mr. Doyle’s termination resulted, in whole or in part, from the publication of his article … or the views expressed in it.” Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. 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Skin patch monitors heart health

first_imgWith the popularity of smart watches and fitness monitors, the revolution in wearable technology has only just begun. Next up may be “skin-like” diagnostics capable of monitoring the health of your heart. Researchers reported online last week in Nature Communications that they’ve created an ultrathin, 5-centimeter-square flexible patch (pictured) that when placed on the skin monitors blood flow underneath, which can reveal changes in heart health. The patch contains an array of 3600 tiny “thermochromic” liquid crystal devices that change color with the temperature. Imaging sensors and computer algorithms then translate the pattern of colors into a temperature profile (see above), and a health report. Because the patches can be worn 24/7, they could offer at-risk patients around-the-clock health monitoring.last_img read more

Use of regulated animals in US biomedical research falls to lowest levels

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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img The number of federally regulated animals used in U.S. biomedical research dropped last year to its lowest level since data collection began in 1972, according to new statistics posted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Approximately 834,000 rabbits, nonhuman primates, and other regulated animals were used in research last year, compared with more than 1.5 million in the early 1970s. The use of these animals has been on a downward trend since 1993, with a 6% decrease from 2013 to 2014. Since USDA first started posting its numbers on its website in 2008, total use has dropped 17%. The figures do not include most mice, rats, birds, and fish, which make up 98% of lab animals but are not covered under the 1966 Animal Welfare Act (AWA).“It’s a continuation of a long-running trend that’s showing no sign of slowing down—in fact it’s speeding up,” says Tom Holder, the director of Speaking of Research, a U.K.-based organization that supports the use of animals in research. Animal rights activists are “very pleased,” says Alka Chandna, the senior laboratory oversight specialist at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), which opposes the use of animals in research.The use of nearly every kind of AWA-covered animal dropped from 2013 to 2014. Twelve percent fewer dogs were used from 2013 to 2014 (16% fewer since 2008), 11% fewer rabbits (36% fewer since 2008), 11% fewer Guinea pigs (26% fewer since 2008), and 10% fewer nonhuman primates (19% fewer since 2008). The only animals to see an increase were “all other covered species,” which includes ferrets, squirrels, and some rodents (such as sand rats and deer mice) that are not excluded from the AWA. They saw a 25% bump from 2013 to 2014 and a 45% increase since 2008. Cats also saw an increase from 2008 of 4%, but a decrease of 13% from 2013 to 2014. A USDA spokesperson says the agency will not speculate on what’s driving the trends, but both Holder and Chandna chalk it up to several factors. Among them: the increasing use of computer modeling and tissue cultures, the outsourcing of animal research to countries like China, and the higher costs and growing logistical challenges of using larger animals like nonhuman primates, which are subject to stricter government oversight than in the past. Chandna also cites changes in public opinion, including a recent Pew Research Center poll that revealed that 50% of Americans now oppose animal research. “These trends reflect shifting societal attitudes,” she says.But the biggest factor appears to be the increasing use of mice and rats in biomedical research. A PETA study conducted earlier this year found that there has been a 73% rise in the use of these animals in U.S. labs over the past 15 years, obviating the need for other types of animals. “We’ve seen a huge rise in the use of genetically modified mice,” agrees Holder, who notes that the trend of using more of these animals and fewer AWA-regulated animals in the United States mirrors what’s happening in the United Kingdom and the rest of Europe. That’s a good thing, he says, because it’s easier to meet the needs of mice and rats than it is for dogs, cats, and nonhuman primates. “I see this as a positive step for animal welfare.”last_img read more

Karolinska Institute may reopen ethics inquiry into work of pioneering surgeon

first_imgA documentary on Swedish Television (SVT) has prompted the Karolinska Institute (KI) in Stockholm to consider reopening its investigation into possible misconduct by surgeon Paolo Macchiarini. After an investigation last year into Macchiarini’s work at KI, where he performed experimental trachea surgery on three patients, Vice-Chancellor Anders Hamsten concluded that the surgeon had not committed misconduct, although some of his work did “not meet the university’s high quality standards in every respect.” But the documentary has raised new concerns by suggesting that Macchiarini misled patients.Macchiarini’s work focused on developing tissue-engineered tracheas to replace those damaged by injury or illness. He and his colleagues developed polymer scaffolds seeded with the patients’ own stem cells that were supposed to grow into living tissue to replace a damaged or missing trachea. He conducted three transplants at KI and its associated hospitals. In 2014, colleagues at KI raised questions about whether Macchiarini’s papers describing successful outcomes were accurate, as several patients fared poorly and two of the three treated at KI died. The university asked an independent investigator to assess the charges. The investigator, Bengt Gerdin, a professor emeritus of surgery at Uppsala University in Sweden, concluded that differences between published papers and lab records were serious enough to constitute scientific misconduct. But a few months later, KI Vice-Chancellor Anders Hamsten concluded that Macchiraini had not committed misconduct. Additional material Macchiarini submitted after Gerdin’s report was published had convincingly countered Gerdin’s conclusions, Hamsten said at the time. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The documentary, a three-part series aired this month on Swedish television, presents evidence that before the surgeries, Macchiarini reassured patients by telling them that animal experiments had been successful when none had taken place. It also follows the story of a woman who received an engineered trachea as part of a clinical trial Macchiarini was conducting in Krasnodar, Russia. Her trachea had been damaged in an accident, but the injury was not life-threatening and she was relatively healthy before receiving the transplant. She did not survive.“We’ve seen footage in SVT’s documentary that is truly alarming, and I empathise deeply with the patients and their relatives,” Hamsten says in a statement KI issued yesterday. “Although the university management knew that he had operated and researched [in Krasnodar], the information that has emerged in the documentaries on the ethical nature of these operations is new to Professor Hamsten,” the statement says. “[G]iven the way Macchiarini’s activities in Russia have been described in the documentary, they would never have been approved.” (Macchiarini told Science in April 2015 that the clinical trial in Russia had been put on hold.)KI said in its statement that it will also look into allegations raised in an article in Vanity Fair published earlier this month. That story claimed that Macchiarini included false information on his CV when KI recruited him in 2010.last_img read more

About 40 of economics experiments fail replication survey

first_imgWhen a massive replicability study in psychology was published last year, the results were, to some, shocking: 60% of the 100 experimental results failed to replicate. Now, the latest attempt to verify findings in the social sciences—this time with a small batch from experimental economics—also finds a substantial number of failed replications. Following the exact same protocols of the original studies, the researchers failed to reproduce the results in about 40% of cases.”I find it reassuring that the replication rate was fairly high,” says Michael L. Anderson, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley, not involved with the study. But he notes that most of the failures came from studies using a 5% “p value” cut-off for statistical significance, suggesting “what some realize but fewer are willing to discuss: The accepted standard of a 5% significance level is not sufficient to generate results that are likely to replicate.”Psychology’s high-profile replication efforts, which were cautiously welcomed by the research community, have triggered policy changes at some scientific journals and modified priorities at many funding agencies. But the overall failure rate has also been called into question, because most of the original studies were reproduced only once, often without strictly following the initial protocol. And most of the replication studies allowed the replicators to choose their targets. Zarghamee’s study, conducted with John Ifcher, an economist at Santa Clara University in California, focused on the effect of happiness on economic decisions. To induce positive emotions in subjects, they used a clip of stand-up comedian Robin Williams. Since that original study was conducted, Williams has committed suicide, so the emotional effect of the video may now be emotionally mixed, or even the opposite, Zarghamee says. And another confounding factor is the audience: The subjects in the original study were American whereas those in the replication were British. “We think it is more accurate to interpret the failure to replicate our result as a ‘treatment failure,'” Zarghamee says.Outside observers see these different outcomes as an inevitable part of social science. “It should not be surprising or discouraging that a substantial number of scientific findings across fields prove difficult to replicate,” says Eric Luis Uhlmann, an economist at the INSEAD business school in Singapore who was not involved in the study. “Small samples are noisy and human populations are diverse.” The solution is to base conclusions on multiple attempts, he says. “Failures to replicate and reproduce findings should be considered a normal part of science.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The latest attempt at social science do-overs—a replication of 18 studies in experimental economics—went to great lengths to avoid such criticisms. “We did not want to pick out studies on any subjective basis,” says lead author Colin Camerer, an economist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Instead, the team set its criteria based on the experimental setup and whether a study produced one central result. They combed through papers published from 2011 through 2014 in two of the field’s top journals, American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics and came up with a set of 18 that met their criteria.”Our approach was very lawyerly,” Camerer says. Before starting, the researchers drew up a three-page “replication report” for each study, spelling out how it would be executed and interpreted. The report was sent out to the original authors for feedback. “The idea was that in retrospect nobody could say we were not clear about the replications [or that we] were being unfair.” And it all went smoothly, he says. “To our pleasant surprise, basically all of them were a combination of flattered and happy we were going to replicate their study.”Eleven of the 18 economic replications succeeded, they report today in Science. “Our takeaway is that the replication rate is rather good,” says Camerer, noting that the study topics from the successful replications reflect “most of the things we study in experimental economics [that] are replicated over and over: Do prices move toward where supply meets demand? Are there ‘price bubbles’ in artificial markets? Do people contribute in ‘public goods’ where spending some of your own money helps the group?””The authors were fair and collegial,” says Homa Zarghamee, an economist at Barnard College in New York City whose 2011 study failed to replicate. “They took great care to exactly replicate our study methodologically,” she says. But she adds that the failure doesn’t mean the results from the original study were a false positive. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emaillast_img read more

Top stories Cat poop mania spying slavery from space and tough lobster

first_img By Alex FoxFeb. 22, 2019 , 1:20 PM Reality check: Can cat poop cause mental illness?Cats carry a brain parasite that infects roughly one in three people around the globe—and has been linked to behavioral changes in rats and mental illness in humans. But a review of current research suggests the human linkages are weak. For example, the odds of developing schizophrenia as a direct result of the cat parasite are so low that they are on par with other risk factors, such as living in a city.Researchers spy signs of slavery from space (left to right): ISTOCK.COM/SUNRAY BRI CATTERY RU; ©2019 DIGITALGLOBE, A MAXAR COMPANY; CLASSICSTOCK/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO Some 40.3 million people around the world are held in bondage today, according to the latest estimates from the International Labor Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. But finding them is hard. Now, a surge in the number of Earth-observing satellites—along with algorithms that can interpret the deluge of data they provide—are putting modern slavery under a spotlight.A lobster’s underbelly is so tough, you could use it instead of car tiresA lobster’s shell is pretty tough. But the transparent material on the underside of its tail may be even more amazing: Lab tests show the thin, stretchy substance is as sturdy as the rubber used to make tires.Why sparks fly when you microwave grapesYouTubers have gone grape crazy. In a plethora of internet videos, kitchen scientists have cut a grape almost in half—leaving just a strip of skin connecting the two sides—and stuck it in the microwave. In seconds, sparks erupt. Now, physicists think they know why this happens.Researchers hung men on a cross and added blood in bid to prove Turin Shroud is realIn an attempt to prove that the Turin Shroud—a strip of linen believed to bear the image of Jesus after his crucifixion—is real, researchers strapped human volunteers to a cross and drenched them in blood. Their finding: The blood flow patterns are consistent enough with those on the shroud that it isn’t necessarily a fake. Most mainstream scientists, however, agree the shroud was created in the 14th century. Top stories: Cat poop mania, spying slavery from space, and tough lobster bellies Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more

Surface trembling detected on Mars for the first time

first_img THE WOODLANDS, TEXAS—After months of delicate maneuvering, NASA’s InSight lander has finished placing its hypersensitive seismometer on the surface of Mars. The instrument is designed to solve mysteries about the planet’s interior by detecting the booming thunder of “marsquakes.” But just a few weeks into its run, the car-size lander has already heard something else: atmosphere-driven trembling that continually roils our red neighbor. If marsquakes are the drum solo, these microseisms, as they’re known, are the bass line.The signal first became apparent in early February, as soon as the lander placed a protective shield over the seismometer, said Philippe Lognonné, a planetary seismologist at Paris Diderot University who heads the team that runs the instrument, in a talk here today at the annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. “We do believe that these signals are waves coming from Mars.” This is the first time, he said, that such microseisms have been detected on another planet.On Earth, microseisms are ubiquitous, caused largely by the sloshing of the ocean by storms and tides. Mars, despite the dreams of science fiction writers, has no present-day oceans. Instead, this newly discovered noise is likely caused by low-frequency pressure waves from atmospheric winds that rattle the surface, inducing shallow, longer-period waves in the surface, called Rayleigh waves, Lognonné said. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country NASA’s InSight lander places a protective, dome-shaped shield above its seismometer. JPL-Caltech/NASA center_img Surface trembling detected on Mars for the first time By Paul VoosenMar. 18, 2019 , 6:10 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Even though InSight has not yet detected a marsquake, the microseisms are an important indicator that the lander’s seismometer is working as hoped. In recent decades, seismologists have begun to see microseisms on Earth as not just a nuisance, but as a valuable tool for understanding features in the subsurface. This noise will be similarly valuable on Mars, Lognonné said, allowing the team’s seismologists to probe the rigid surface crust in the immediate vicinity around the lander.But the seismometer has had little time to listen so far. Although the sand-filled crater where InSight landed, nicknamed “Homestead Hollow,” had little in the way of large rocks to complicate its placement, the deployment still took a month longer than planned, thanks to two delicate tasks. First, scientists had to carefully tweak the electric tether connecting the seismometer to the lander, in order to reduce noise coming off the lander. Then, they had to place a wind and heat shield over the instrument.Since then, InSight has spent much of its time troubleshooting for its second instrument, a heat probe designed to burrow up to 5 meters below the surface. The robotic arm placed that instrument in mid-February. But soon after the probe began to hammer itself into the surface, its 40-centimeter-long “mole” got stuck on a rock or some other blockage just 30 centimeters down. Now, mission scientists have put the hammering on hold as they wait for the agencies’ engineers to evaluate their options. That will continue for several more weeks, said Bruce Banerdt, InSight’s principal investigator and a geophysicist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.Although the microseisms are a thrill to hear, everyone working on InSight is waiting for the main event: their first marsquake. There’s no need to panic about not seeing one yet, Banerdt said. “Before we get nervous … [the mission is] exactly where we expected to be.” The team expects to detect about one marsquake a month, but these will likely come in clusters, not perfectly spaced out. Banerdt, who had been preparing this mission for decades, can be patient, he said. “The wait’s not completely over yet.”*Clarification, 20 March, 12:25 p.m.: This story’s headline and text were changed to prevent confusion that it might refer to marsquakes, which, as the article states, have not yet been detected by InSight. Similarly, the spacecraft has not detected an analogue for a longer-period background “hum” seen on Earth.last_img read more

Fans Await Mone Davis Hampton University Debut

first_img Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Coming soon to a softball field near you! Go Lady Pirates!! @HUAthletics1868 @Hampton_SB pic.twitter.com/ejaptqyJij Davis hasn’t even entered her twenties yet but has already broken several barriers for girls and women in sports. In 2014—the now 17-year-old—became the first girl to pitch a shutout in Little League World Series history while playing for the Philadelphia-based Taney Youth Baseball Association. Her accomplishments landed her a spot on the cover of Sports Illustrated; making her the first Little League player to grace the front cover. Davis has also received several accolades for her achievements, including an award from Sports Illustrated Kids and being featured on ESPNW’s Impact 25 list. She was also named Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year in 2014.Although the softball season is months away, fans are excited for the Springside Chestnut Hill Academy graduate to kick off her collegiate athletic career. For Davis, Hampton feels like home. “The girls on the team are amazing. The coaches are amazing,” she said in an interview with The Undefeated. “It just kind of felt like home, which is what you look for in a school. Everything felt right. Since I’m spending my next four years there, I have to be comfortable.”During the 2019 softball season, the Hampton Pirates finished with a 23-25 record. Hampton University’s head softball coach Angela Nicholson is excited to have Davis on the team. “She is an outstanding athlete who just loves to compete no matter what sport it is,” she told the NCAA.  “Davis is great at everything and her hands up the middle are second to none.  She is very dynamic in her movements, has a smooth transfer and just a strong knack for the game.” Black Twitter Is Split On Reparations After Contentious House Hearing It’s been nearly five years since Philadelphia-bred sports phenom Mo’ne Davis took the world by storm and made history by becoming the first African American girl to play in the Little League World Series. Now, after deciding to take her talents to Hampton University last year, her fans are waiting for her highly anticipated debut on the college softball field. House Judiciary Committee Holds Hearing On American Slavery Reparations — Hampton University (@_HamptonU) June 19, 2019 Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. SUBSCRIBE College Softball , Hampton University , HBCU , Mo’Ne Davis , Softball , Sports SEE ALSO:HBCU World Series Aims To Diversify College BaseballLittle League Phenom Mo’ne Davis Headed To Hampton Universitylast_img read more

Chicago White Sox Official Regrets Honoring Emmett Till

first_img More By NewsOne Staff Chicago , Emmett Till , White Sox Donham only admitted her lie to a white author, Timothy Tyson, who has since put her testimony “under lock and key,” the Amsterdam News reports. Donham’s confession is under restriction until 2036.SEE ALSO:Emmett Till Accuser Lied About Claims That Led To Lynching: ReportAnother Emmett Till Sign Defaced In MississippiU.S. Department Of Justice May Re-Open Emmett Till Murder Case Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ He continued, “We talked about it. He regretted it. Certainly, he admitted it was a mistake. The intent certainly wasn’t to insult anybody, not Emmett Till by any means. It was, in a sense, famous Chicagoans.”Reifert explaned it was “an honest mistake” and “there was no ill will meant by any of it.”However, there won’t be a chance in protocol, “Obviously, lots of stuff goes on over the course of the season, so you’ve got to trust people to do their jobs. He did not intend that by any stretch of the imagination. He regretted it as soon as I pointed it out. He understood and apologized.”Emmett Till was kidnapped, tortured, and murdered after Carolyn Bryant Donham accused him of whistling at her at the Bryant Grocery Store in Mississippi. Roy Bryant, Donham’s then-husband, and J. W. Milam kidnapped and brutally murdered Till. Mamie Till held an open-casket funeral for her son so that the world could see what the men had done to her boy. Donham has since admitted that she lied. She is reportedly 85 years old, has never paid for falsely accusing a child of a crime, which resulted in him being lynched.In 2017, “The Blood of Emmett Till,” a book by Timothy Tyson, claims that Carolyn Bryant Donham admitted to lying about Till whistling at her, prompting a mob of White men to pursue and kill him in Money, Mississippi, at the height of Jim Crow laws in 1955.“Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him,” Donham is quoted as saying in the book, writes the New York Daily News. At trial, Carolyn Bryant delivered the most explosive testimony, claiming that Till had grabbed and threatened her inside her husband’s store. “That part’s not true,” she says in Tyson’s book, according to Vanity Fair.center_img Black boys and men killed by police composite photo Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist On Saturday, during a break in the White Sox-Twins game, the park’s big screen honored people from Chicago with three individuals on the screen that included “Wheel of Fortune” host Pat Sajak, legendary actor and director Orson Welles, and  Emmett Till , the 14-year-old who was lynched on August 28, 1955. One Chicago White Sox official reportedly said it was “poor form” to show Emmett Till as one of the “famous people from Chicagoland.”See Also: Meet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s ClothesThe Chicago Tribune reports, Scott Reifert, the White Sox’s vice president of communications, said he told the staffer who created the graphic shown during Saturday’s game that including Till “kind of minimalized [that this] is a young man who lost his life.” 62 Black Men And Boys Killed By Policelast_img read more

Aston Martin Plans to Make Old Cars Electric so They Dont Get

first_imgA car name synonymous with extravagance, Aston Martin was founded in 1913 by Lionel Martin, and since then it has become famous for its mix of hand-made craftsmanship, first-rate technology and design, power, speed, and utter luxury. The brand has had a classy and somewhat romanticized image, especially since one of its models, the DB5, first appeared in the James Bond film Goldfinger, in 1964.Actor Sean Connery, the original James Bond, is pictured here on the set of Goldfinger with one of the fictional spy’s cars, a 1964 Aston Martin DB5. Photo by Getty ImagesAston Martin has had its share of financial struggles over the years and has changed owners numerous times, but the company has always been able to stay relevant and sought after among automotive aficionados. Today, however, the brand is facing a new set of challenges.In a world where the effects of climate change are becoming an ever-increasing concern, many cities around the world, but especially in Europe, are becoming increasingly unfriendly to the internal-combustion engine and its emissions.Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Photo by Brian Snelson CC BY 2.0Given that, what can a classic car owner do? Having a wonderful vintage automobile is a lot less fun if you can’t drive it.Aston Martin has come up with a solution for this dilemma. According to the Verge, the automaker just announced that it’s launching a “Heritage EV” program, where owners of classic AM vehicles can have them converted to an entirely electric powertrain.A model of Aston Martin’s iconic DB5. Released in 1963, it found global fame as the gadget-laden transport of the world’s most famous secret agent, James Bond.The automaker is currently working on developing an all-electric sports car called the Rapide E, which they anticipate releasing late in 2019, and they are planning on using components from that car design to do the conversions.Conversions are probably the only way a lot of people will be able to experience the Rapide E’s 200-mile range on one charge, 155 mph top speed, and 0-60 mph in less than 4 seconds acceleration, too, since AM is only planning on making 155 of them.Aston Martin Rapide. Photo by EurovisionNim CC BY-SA 4.0The conversions will also start becoming available late next year, and AM is planning on starting the program with a conversion plan for the 1970 DB6 MkII Volante. The goal is to make the switch while having the smallest possible impact on the car’s look.According to newsatlas.com, they’ll make “cassettes” based on the Rapide E, which slide into mounts where the car’s original gearbox and engine used to be. The cassette will hold a motor and a battery pack. Umbilical cords will connect the car’s electrical systems to the pack.Aston Martin Rapide Fastback. Photo by Damian Morys CC BY 2.0The electrical systems will be able to be monitored via a small screen installed in the car’s interior, which should be the only visible change to the vehicle’s look.There isn’t any real data yet on how the system will perform in a car which isn’t a Rapide E, but if owners don’t care for their conversion after they’ve tried it out, it’s been designed to be reversible. The cassettes and their mounts can just be disconnected, and the original motor re-installed. Reversing the conversion may not be inexpensive, but that’s not generally an issue with most AM owners.An Aston Martin DB5 is seen at the 2013 All-British Field meet at VanDusen Botanical Garden. The classic car show features modern and historic automobiles from British manufacturers.Paul Spires, the president of Aston Martin Works, said of the conversions, “We have been looking for some time to find a way of protecting our customer’s long-term enjoyment of their cars.Driving a classic Aston Martin on pure EV power is a unique experience and one that will no doubt be extremely attractive to many owners, especially those that live in city centers.”Aston Martin DB4 Vantage. Photo by André Karwath aka Aka CC BY-SA 2.5Aston Martin is only one of the most recent companies to work at developing EV conversions for classic cars. Dgit Daily has a list of others who are already working out how to preserve other models in a similar way and at widely variable price points.The list includes, but isn’t limited to, a Renovo Coupe which is a recreation of the Shelby Daytona that won at Le Mans in 1964, for a cool $529,000. Zelectric Motors offers a $68,000 VW Beetle which replaces the original motor with electric power.EV4U made a conversion for the classic Porsche 911 which runs about $23,500 in addition to the cost of the base car, and even Maserati created a conversion package for the 1985 Biturbo.Read another story from us: Aston Martin to Produce Limited Edition “Dream Cars”Clearly, there are plenty of modern classic car enthusiasts who don’t want to give up the pleasure of driving their classics, and they are willing to take the steps necessary to continue.last_img read more

US President confirms no withdrawal from security pact Japan

first_img Post Comment(s) By Reuters |Tokyo | Published: June 25, 2019 2:45:33 pm China says Xi urged Trump to ease North Korea sanctions ‘in due course’ US Senate backs massive defense bill, targets China, sets Iran vote With a new threat, Iran tests the resolve of the US and its allies Related News US-japan treaty, US-Japan relations, Donald Trump, Yoshihide Suga, world news, indian express US president Donald Trump considered withdrawing from the pact.Japan’s top government spokesman said on Tuesday the United States has confirmed its defense treaty with Japan after a report suggested U.S. President Donald Trump considered withdrawing from the pact.Bloomberg reported on Monday that Trump has recently spoken privately about withdrawing from the treaty as he is of the view that the pact treated the United States unfairly.“The thing reported in the media you mentioned does not exist,” Yoshihide Suga told reporters in Tokyo.“We have received confirmation from the U.S. president it is incompatible with the U.S. government policy,” he added.last_img read more

Donald Trump on Democratic debate BORING

first_img After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Donald Trump, US democrats debate, US debate 2020, 2020 presidential election, us presidential elections, donald trump tweet, donald trump boring tweet Asked by a reporter how he thought the Democrats would do during the debate, Trump said, “I think they’re all going to do very poorly.”President Donald Trump dismissed the first Democratic debate as “BORING” on Wednesday night, predicting that the 10 rivals on stage seeking to toss him from office in the 2020 election would do poorly. The debate began at about the same time that Air Force One, carrying Trump and his entourage to Japan, stopped to refuel at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage, Alaska.“There’s a big debate going on; it just started,” Trump told U.S. troops at the base during the refueling. “I had my choice between you and them, and I chose you.”Asked by a reporter how he thought the Democrats would do during the debate, Trump said, “I think they’re all going to do very poorly.” Best Of Express Related News Advertising Advertising He heard chants of “four more years, four more years” in his appearance in Washington on Wednesday before the Faith and Freedom Coalition, an evangelical Christian group.Privately, some advisers worry about his chances in several states he won in 2016, such as Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Former HUD Secretary Julian Castro talks with U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren as New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio hugs Senator Amy Klobuchar at the conclusion of the first U.S. 2020 presidential election Democratic candidates debate in Miami, Florida, U.S., June 26, 2019. REUTERS/Mike SegarThere were some internal worries at the campaign in recent weeks that the job of Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale might be at risk after the leak of internal polling that showed Trump doingbadly in several key states, a Trump adviser said.Trump ultimately fired two of his three pollsters, which appeared to calm those worries for now, the adviser told Reuters.Trump raised $6 million on Tuesday night for Trump Victory, a joint fundraising committee for Trump’s re-election campaign and the Republican National Committee, an RNC official said. Advertising More Explained Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Post Comment(s) US mulls increasing merit-based immigration to 57% Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Trump’s campaign bought the masthead advertisement at the top of YouTube for Wednesday, showing two ads during the debate that urged visitors to text a phone number for campaign updates or to vote for a Trump rally in their state.On Facebook, the campaign ran a slew of paid ads that referenced the debate, asking people to take his tongue-in-cheek ‘Official Trump vs. Democrat Poll.’The opinion poll, which required respondents to submit their contact details, posed questions such as “Who do you believe will ALWAYS put America FIRST?” with options such as President Trump or “A Sleazy Democrat.”Trump, who has been a polarizing, name-calling and often chaotic president, is publicly expressing confidence about his re-election prospects in 2020. Taking stock of monsoon rain Trump says ‘will take a look’ at accusations over Google, China Once he got back on the plane and the debate had begun, he fired off a one-word tweet: “BORING.”He also took aim at NBC News and MSNBC when a technical glitch delayed the debate’s second hour. He has consistently accused the network of not treating him fairly.BORING!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 27, 2019.@NBCNews and @MSNBC should be ashamed of themselves for having such a horrible technical breakdown in the middle of the debate. Truly unprofessional and only worthy of a FAKE NEWS Organization, which they are!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 27, 2019“@NBCNews and @MSNBC should be ashamed of themselves for having such a horrible technical breakdown in the middle of the debate. Truly unprofessional and only worthy of a FAKE NEWS Organization, which they are!” he tweeted.While Trump was dismissive, his campaign team was closely monitoring the debate in Miami in Florida, a state Trump won in 2016 but which is predicted to be close again in 2020. US House votes to set aside impeachment resolution against Trump By Reuters |Washington | Published: June 27, 2019 8:56:17 am He has now brought in $36 million for Trump Victory since formally launching his campaign a week ago in Florida.last_img read more